Saskatoon

Sask. marijuana users asked to be cautious as edibles hit store shelves Tuesday

The provincial government says people should be prepared as marijuana edibles, extracts and topicals become available for purchase this week.

Store owner says beginner users should 'go low and slow'

Cannabis edibles, CBD infused gummies, and other products were legalized in Canada on Oct. 17, 2019. They are expected to hit store shelves in Saskatchewan this week. (Shutterstock/Victor Moussa)

The provincial government says people should be prepared as marijuana edibles, extracts and topicals become available for purchase this week.

While these products have been approved by Health Canada, experts said edibles work differently in people's bodies than smoked marijuana.

"Consumers should be starting low and going slow," said Geoff Conn, owner of Saskatoon's The Pot Shack. "Your body's got to get used to it."

Conn said edibles often have a longer onset period between eating the pot and feeling its effects. As a result, people need to be careful not to ingest too much if they think the edible isn't working.

"When you take an edible, it usually takes on average 15 to 20 minutes for your liver to process everything, and go through your body," said Conn. "Then you'll start feeling the effects."

While Health Canada approved marijuana edibles in October, all suppliers had to undergo a 60-day testing period before their products were allowed for sale in legal stores.

As a result, some stores may be waiting for products as they get official government approval.

"I think some of the producers ran into some glitches with testing and that sort of thing," said Conn, who expects some products will be available in his store on Tuesday.

The provincial government reminded the public that marijuana is only legal if it's purchased in approved stores. 

Penalties for driving under the influence of cannabis may include immediate license suspension and a vehicle seizure for up to 60 days. Police said that the Draeger 5000 roadside testing kit can detect any marijuana taken orally, whether smoked or eaten.

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