Saskatoon

Metal detective uncovers bits of Saskatoon's history

For the past three years, Yasha Rassi has been actively finding treasures with his metal detector, from bottle caps to lost jewelry to antique toys. His latest find was his biggest: A historical street sign from 1912.

Yasha Rassi's biggest find: Street sign from 1912

Yasha Rassi's biggest metal detecting find is a street sign from 1912. (Victoria Dinh/CBC)

Insurance adjuster by day to metal detective by night, one Saskatoon man has found a way to balance work and play — all while finding bits of history along the way.

Three years ago, Yasha Rassi picked up his first metal detector from a thrift shop. Since then, he has been actively finding treasures from bottle caps to lost jewelry to antique toys.

His latest find was his biggest: A street sign from 1912.

"A friend of mine, Walt Degenstein, was able to look it up and, sure enough, there was a tail-end of Railway Street where we were digging," said Rassi.

"Discovering the sign obviously got me looking into the history of Saskatoon."

Some of the buried items uncovered include antique treasures. (Victoria Dinh/CBC)

Rassi said his initial interest in metal detecting came from looking for something to do with his two kids.

"You just have to convince them that bottle caps and pull-tabs are treasure and you're good to go," he joked.

The trio has a YouTube channel called Metal Detective to share what Rassi calls their "dirt fishing" adventures.

As for new members gearing up to embark on the metal detecting game, he advised, "Leave the park the same way you found it or better."

With files from CBC Radio's Saskatoon Morning

now