Saskatoon·Photos

Eat your way around the world on 22nd Street

You don't need to leave Saskatoon to enjoy savoury Indian curries, flavourful Middle Eastern falafel or spicy Chinese beef dishes.

Enjoy food from India to China to El Salvador

Originally from Pakistan, Hanif Muhammad, opened H67 Pizza and Donair eight years ago. (Matt Kruchak/CBC)

You don't need to leave Saskatoon to enjoy savoury Indian curries, flavourful Middle Eastern falafel or spicy Chinese beef dishes.

You don't even need to travel to different parts of the city — just head down 22nd Street. 

As Saskatoon Morning explores the future of 22nd Street, online host Matt Kruchak took a trip to visit just a few of the many restaurants that serve food from around the world.


"When I came to Saskatoon, east side people always feel proud of their east side," said Sadiqur Rahman, owner of Swadesh Restaurant. "And I think they're a little bit 'I don't know about the west side. I don't want to go on the west side.'  But when I started my business on the west side, believe me, there is lots of immigrant people living on the west side. West side people are really so good and that's why I chose 22nd Street. It is the right place for doing the business."

A cook at Swadesh Restaurant holds a tray of tandoori chicken. (Matt Kruchak/CBC)
A sizzling order of chicken, beef kabab roll and vegetables from Swadesh Restaurant. (Matt Kruchak/CBC)

H67 Pizza and Donair

"We had some tough times, but it's getting better," said Kashif Malik, manager of H67 Pizza and Donair. "It's good now. [22nd Street] wasn't a good place to do business eight years ago, but business is getting better and better. More and more people coming to the city." 

Originally from Pakistan, Hanif Muhammad, opened H67 Pizza and Donair eight years ago. (Matt Kruchak/CBC)
H67 Donair and Pizza is divided in half. Customers wanting donairs and falafel order on the left side of the restaurant and those wanting pizza order on the other side of the shop. (Matt Kruchak/CBC)

Saba's African Cuisine

Saba Keleta is the cook, owner and namesake of Saba's African Cuisine, which has been located on 22nd Street for 10 years. "I've noticed that we have more and more traffic," said Keleta, who is originally from Eritrea. "Everyday there's more and more cars." With the increase in traffic, more people are discovering the restaurant, she said.

The meat platter is Saba's African Cuisine's most popular dish. It includes spicy chicken with an egg, mild beef, medium beef, lentils, mixed veggies and yellow split peas. (Matt Kruchak/CBC)
Just a few of the cultural objects on display at Saba's African Cuisine. (Matt Kruchak/CBC)

EE Burritos 

"Any ethnic restaurant that you find, it's because there's a need," said Kathleen Lipinski, owner of the Latin American restaurant EE Burritos. "People want that little bit of home.  It doesn't matter if it's Ukrainian, East Indian — whatever. You miss certain tastes of home and it's good to go there."

Co-owners of EE Burritos Kathleen Lipinski (stirring a pot of beans) and Manrique Medrano. (Matt Kruchak/CBC)
Kathleen Lipinski, owner of EE Burritos, fries up tortilla shells. The Latin American food restaurant doesn't have a deep fryer. This old cast iron frying pan is all she uses. (Matt Kruchak/CBC)

Cafe Roma

"One of the reasons why I like it a lot is because this is an area with a lot of diversity," said owner of Cafe Roma, Joseph Silveira, who is originally from Portugal. "A lot of different cultures. A lot of different people from different parts of the world. You get to meet a lot of different kinds of people. You get to talk to them about where they're from. What was it like over-there? Why did they come here?"

"It's nice to see the area changing, because I believe the more places will open up, restaurants and coffee shops," Cafe Roma owner Joseph Silveira said. "I think it will be good for the area. I think people will realize that this is not a bad area." (Matt Kruchak/CBC)

Do you have a favourite restaurant on 22nd Street? Leave your picks in the comments section below. 

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