Saskatoon

$3.1M deficit eyed at city hall as drivers steer clear of speeding, parking tickets

Parking tickets, Saskatoon Transit, traffic violations (like speeding) and the city's golf courses all fell short of revenue projections by $1.7 million, $1 million, $871,000 and $296,000, respectively.

Commercial haulers driving past city dump also indirectly costing the city money

The City of Saskatoon is projecting a $3.1 million deficit for 2017, but the figure will be finalized this spring. (Guy Quenneville/CBC)

The City of Saskatoon says it may post a $3.1 million deficit for 2017, and it's blaming slumping revenues from parking tickets, traffic violations and the city dump.

Put another way, people wary of getting fined are being more law-abiding while commercial haulers are trucking their garbage past the city landfill to other sites. Those trends are indirectly costing the city some potential cash.

"Landfill revenue experienced a $1.28 million shortfall in 2017," according to a report going to the city council finance committee on Monday.

Parking tickets, Saskatoon Transit, traffic violations (like speeding) and the city's golf courses also fell short of projections by $1.7 million, $1 million, $871,000 and $296,000, respectively.

The trickle of coin into the city's non-tax piggy banks was flagged by the city last November during 2018 budget time and comes despite Saskatoon's growing population.

The $3.1 million deficit figure will be revised this spring, however, and the final shortfall will ultimately be covered by a stabilization reserve that's currently sitting at $8.1 million.

The city hopes its move toward garbage as a utility may reverse the trend of slumping landfill revenues, though how exactly residents will be billed for waste under that new system remains to be ironed out.

About the Author

Guy Quenneville

Reporter at CBC Saskatoon

Story tips? guy.quenneville@cbc.ca

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