Saskatoon

Agreement reached between solar co-op and Saskatoon Light and Power

If everything goes according to plan, solar panels will be powering a methane gas plant at the Saskatoon landfill by next year.

Solar plant would power landfill gas plant, still needs council approval

Saskatoon is hoping to sell electricity generated by burning methane gas collected at its landfill. (CBC)

If everything goes according to plan, solar panels will be powering a methane gas plant at the Saskatoon landfill by next year.

The Saskatchewan Environmental Society Solar Co-operative has reached an agreement with Saskatoon Light and Power to power the plant.

"The methane is burned, and that produces power," said co-operative President Joe Schmutz. "But in order to pull the methane and all the other off-gases off the landfill, that takes energy."

The methane gas plant is designed to burn gas coming out of decomposing material at the landfill and create electricity. Right now, the city is buying the electricity to run the station.

The plan still needs to be approved by city council. If that happens, the project isn't expected to be up and running until next year.

The methane plant would be the first project the co-op builds. 

Eventually, the co-op plans to build a network of 400 solar panels that would sell energy to Saskatoon Light and Power. The money that the co-op makes from energy sales would be rebated to members.