Saskatoon

3 ways to stop the spread of Dutch elm disease

Dutch elm disease has destroyed millions of elm trees since it was brought to North America in the 1930s.

Saskatoon dealing with first-ever case

Dutch elm disease was introduced to North America in the 1930s. (CBC)

Dutch elm disease has destroyed millions of elm trees since it was brought to North America in the 1930s. 

Despite being in Saskatchewan since the 1980s, the City of Saskatoon said it is now only dealing with its first case. 

Jeff Boone, the city's pest management supervisor, said there are a number of things the public can do to help stop the spread of the disease. 

  1. Respect the elm tree pruning ban, which runs from April 10 to August 31, when elm bark beetles are most active. Pruning can be done at any other time of the year. 
  2. Do not store any elm material. If you do prune or remove a tree, take it to the City of Saskatoon landfill. 
  3. Do not transport any elm wood or material from another location, including firewood. 

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