Saskatchewan

Wall pledges more money for low-income disabled people

The Saskatchewan Party has unveiled what it's calling its most expensive promise of the campaign — a plan to give more money to low-income disabled people.

The Saskatchewan Party has unveiled what it's calling its most expensive promise of the campaign — a plan to give more money to low-income disabled people.

On Monday, Saskatchewan Party Leader Brad Wall  announced a major expansion of the Saskatchewan Assured Income for Disability (SAID) program.

About 3,000 people in residential care are on the income support program, but with the expansion to people who aren't in residential care, 7,000 more will be added.

If re-elected, the Saskatchewan Party says, the government will also increase benefits over the next four years by $100 a month for people in residential care, $350 a month for single people living outside residential care and $400 a month for couples living outside residential care.

The expansion  and the increases will cost about $18.4 million in the first year and $33 million by year four.

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