Saskatchewan

University of Saskatchewan reducing undergrad fees by average of $18 per student for fall semester

Gabriella Fourie, a third year history student at the university, said the reduction was "ridiculous."

'I thought that was pretty ridiculous': U of S student

The statement also said some facilities may not be open for the beginning of the semester, so in that case, they've reduced fees. For example, students will pay 25 per cent less in their athletic and recreation fees. (Guy Quenneville/CBC)

University of Saskatchewan (U of S) undergraduate students will pay an average of $18 less in fees for the upcoming fall semester.

In a statement, Anthony Vannelli, Provost and Vice-President Academic at the U of S, said the fee restructuring was done in consultation with several different campus organizations.

"Almost 80 per cent of the student fees collected by USask are done so on behalf of a variety of third-party providers. As such, the university only directly determines about 20 per cent of student fees levied," part of the statement reads.

Meanwhile, grad students will pay an average of $21 more in fees for the fall semester.

The statement also said some facilities may not be open for the beginning of the semester, so in that case, they've reduced fees. For example, students will pay 25 per cent less in their athletic and recreation fees. 

Gabriella Fourie is a third year student taking history. She said the reduction was "ridiculous."

According to a Saskatoon Star-Phoenix article from 2017, the president at the U of S makes $420,000 a year. Fourie wondered whether top officials at the university would be taking a pay cut. 

"The quality of education is not going to be the same," she said. "From what I experienced from my last semester... online, that was horrific. It was incredibly frustrating."

Fourie said she knows it's not entirely the fault of the university and said she thinks under funding and cuts to post-secondary education play a role in this as well. Still, she feels like the university is not doing enough. 

Fourie herself has been impacted by the economic consequences of COVID-19 — she was laid off from both her jobs during finals this year. 

"I think a lot of students are going to suffer, especially those who do not always have access to good internet or a high quality laptop," she said. 

"I feel appalled. It feels like it reflects an institution which does not care for its students, which just uses them for their money practically. It's offensive."

Corrections

  • A previous version of this story said the U of S is adjusting tuition rates. In fact, it is adjusting student fees.
    Jun 01, 2020 9:59 AM CT

About the Author

Emily Pasiuk

Reporter/Associate Producer

Emily Pasiuk is a Regina-based reporter for CBC Saskatchewan and an associate producer for The Morning Edition. She has filmed two documentaries, reported at CTV Saskatoon and written for Global Regina. Reach her at emily.pasiuk@cbc.ca.

With files from Chelsea Laskowski

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