Why is 'Premier' Brad Wall now the 'Saskatchewan Party leader'?

Now that Saskatchewan's election campaign is officially underway, the legislature has been dissolved and there is no longer an Official Opposition leader. While there is still a premier and a cabinet, who must run the province even during the campaign, CBC is judicious about when we use those titles in our election stories.

CBC's policy on titles for politicians during campaigns

Saskatchewan Party Leader Brad Wall kicks off his party's campaign in Saskatoon on March 8. (CBC)

Now that Saskatchewan's election campaign is officially underway, the legislature has been dissolved and there is no longer an Official Opposition leader.

While there is still a premier and a cabinet, who must run the province even during the campaign, CBC is judicious about when we use those titles in our election stories.

Inserting government titles into election stories can be seen as giving incumbents an advantage.

For decades, CBC's practice during election campaigns has been to refer to premiers and cabinet ministers by party affiliation rather than by titles such as premier or minister.

The exception is for stories which occur off the campaign trail, for instance, if Premier Brad Wall meets with the lieutenant-governor to dissolve the legislative assembly or speaks on behalf of the province about a breaking news event.

This does not mean that you will never see the title of premier in an election story.

Sometimes it may provide context, such as "Brad Wall has been premier since his party was first elected in 2007" or "during the last sitting of the legislature, Cam Broten led the Official Opposition with nine seats."

But in general, this will be the exception rather than the rule.

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