Saskatchewan

1st Tesla Powerwall, which lets you store solar energy, installed in Sask. home

Generating power is not the issue when it comes to many renewable energy sources, but storing it is. That's why Chris Taschuk recently had a Tesla Powerwall installed in his home.

'It's always been a problem: What do you do at night with solar power?' says Chris Taschuk

Chris Taschuk is the proud owner of Saskatchewan's first Tesla Powerwall. (Submitted by Chris Taschuk)

Chris Taschuk already had solar panels installed on his farm near Pilot Butte, Sask. — all he was missing was a way to store the power. 

"It's always been a problem," said Tuschak. "What do you do at night with solar power?"

Generating power is not the issue when it comes to many renewable energy sources, but storing it is. That's why Taschuk recently had a Tesla Powerwall installed in his home.

The Powerwall is the first of its kind to be installed in the province and essentially acts as rechargeable battery that can power a home when the electricity goes out.

"You can charge your battery during the day with the sun and then at night you can actually use the battery to actually have power during the night," said Taschuk.

During a power outage, the Powerwall works instantly as a generator for the house, which means you don't have reset your digital clocks, lose unsaved work or any number of other technology related headaches.

'Somebody at some point has to do their part'

Taschuk said he follows Tesla and founder Elon Musk quite closely, and when the Powerwall was announced and became available in Canada, he ordered it.

On the Tesla website, each Powerwall, with supporting hardware, is listed at $8,100.

Taschuk said it was worth it.

"I do a lot of thinking about what the future of mankind is going to be like if we just stick our heads in the sand and pretend that fossil fuel isn't going to run out," he said.

"Also, there's the whole aspect of global warming, which isn't good for anybody and might cause our early demise."

By 2030, SaskPower plans to have 50 per cent of all power in the province generated by renewable means. (Prashanth Vishwanathan/Bloomberg)

Brooke Longpre, the co-founder and owner of Sound Solar Systems, said the installation of solar panels and technology is part of a common good.

"We're moving toward a more sustainable way to live here," said Longpre. "It's an important piece of a lifestyle where you're producing power, you're consuming power and then you're storing power."

Her company installs Powerwalls in Saskatchewan and Alberta. Longpre said there are several people who will have the Powerwalls installed in Saskatchewan in the near future. 

"Somebody, at some point, has to do their part," said Longpre. 

By 2030, the SaskPower plans to have 50 per cent of all power in the province generated by renewable means.

About the Author

Alec Salloum

Journalist

Alec Salloum is a reporter and producer with CBC Saskatchewan. Salloum has worked at CBC Saskatchewan since 2016. Story idea? News tip? Want to say hello? Get in touch at @AlecJSalloum or alec.salloum@cbc.ca