Saskatchewan

Sunday brought record heat to Saskatchewan

Mankota registered the hottest temperatures in the country at 38.2 C.

Temperatures climbed into the mid-30s in many areas

Mankota, north of Grasslands National Park, registered the hottest temperatures in the country at 38.2 C. (Neil Cochrane/CBC)

Record warm conditions rolled through southern and central Saskatchewan on Sunday. 

Temperatures soared into the mid-30s in many regions, feeling closer to 40 with the humidity.

Mankota, Sask., north of Grasslands National Park, registered the hottest temperatures in the country at 38.2 C.

Temperature records were broken in many regions, including:

  • Cypress Hills: 33 C. (Old record was 32.2 C, set in 1926.)
  • Assiniboia: 37.7 C. (Old record was 36.1 C, set in 2007.)
  • Maple Creek: 36.3 C. (Old record was 36.1 C, set in 1946.)
  • Regina, which experienced its warmest overnight low at 18.6 C. (Old record was 18 C, set in 1984.)

Stormy evening

That hot and unstable weather gave way to severe thunderstorms Sunday afternoon and evening in central Saskatchewan. 

A tornado warning was also issued for a portion of central Saskatchewan near Martensville, as a very strong storm system rolled through. There have been no confirmed reports of tornadoes in the area. 

Much cooler in northern Sask.

While southern Saskatchewan saw some of its warmest weather on record, the northern part of the province saw a vastly different weather picture, breaking temperature records with cold overnight lows. 

Key Lake, for instance, dropped to 5.7 C. Its last record was 6.1 C, set in 1977.

What does the forecast look like?

Cooler weather is expected for the first couple days of August, with daily highs remaining closer to the 20 C mark.

Temperatures could warm again by the end of the work week, but they are forecasted to remain in the 20s.


ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Christy Climenhaga

CBC Meteorologist

Christy Climenhaga, CBC Edmonton, Calgary and Saskatchewan's Meteorologist, covers weather and climate change stories for the prairies.

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