Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan E.I. claims rose 11% over past year: StatsCan

There was an 11.2 per cent spike in Saskatchewan residents filing employment insurance claims between November 2018 and 2019, according to the most recent data from Statistics Canada.

Number of people who actually received employment insurance benefits rose by 3%

On a month-to-month basis, there were 6.5 per cent more people accessing E.I. benefits in Saskatoon during November compared to October; Regina saw an increase of 5 per cent over the previous month. (Sean Kilpatrick/The Canadian Press)

There was an 11.2 per cent spike in Saskatchewan residents filing employment insurance claims between November 2018 and November 2019, according to the most recent data from Statistics Canada.

The number of people in Sask. who actually received E.I. benefits during that same time rose by three per cent, in comparison.

"Occupations in manufacturing and utilities, and trades, transports and equipment operators in related occupations, they also had notable increases in the year-over-year beneficiaries," said Brittany Milton, an analyst with StatsCan.

There was a 25.9 per cent jump in the number of people from manufacturing and utilities who received E.I. benefits during that period of time in Saskatchewan, Milton said.

"[A] very big jump," he said. 

Nation-wide, there was a 12.5 per cent increase in manufacturing and utilities workers accessing E.I.

The next closest jump in E.I. beneficiaries could be found among trades and transport workers at a 9.1 per cent jump. The national average was a jump of 2.8 per cent.

The total number of people receiving E.I. in Saskatchewan was 15,930 during November, a 3.5 per cent increase over October's numbers.

On a month-to-month basis, there were 6.5 per cent more people accessing E.I. benefits in Saskatoon during November compared to October; Regina saw an increase of 5 per cent over the previous month.

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