Saskatchewan

Schmeiser gets another shot at Monsanto

A farmer found guilty of knowingly planting Monsanto seeds on his land and violating patent laws of Monsanto's genetically modified canola will take his fight to the Supreme Court of Canada. Percy Schmeiser was found guilty by a federal court two years ago.

A farmer found guilty of knowingly planting Monsanto seeds on his land and violating patent laws of Monsanto's genetically modified canola will take his fight to the Supreme Court of Canada. Percy Schmeiser was found guilty by a federal court two years ago.

A Federal judge ruled Schmeiser violated Monsanto's patent on Roundup Ready canola and was ordered to pay $15,000 dollars for using the seed without permission.

Schmeiser has always maintained he did not knowingly plant genetically modified canola in his fields.

Monsanto sought up to $400,000 in damages and court costs. Monsanto used the case to test their patent on their genetically modified canola.

"We did have a number of people waiting in the queue," Monsanto's Trish Jordan said in July, 2001. She said Schmeiser "was the first case where we attempted to find out if the patent was valid."

Schmeiser's lawyers say that the Bruno farmer did not spray his canola crop with round-up, did not sell the seeds to anyone else for planting, did not profit from Monsanto's invention, and did not violate the company's patent rights.

Schmeiser launched a $10 million countersuit against Monsanto, claiming the company defamed him and its product polluted his fields.

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