Brad Wall touts Sask. population growth, despite oil patch woes

It's a good sign that Saskatchewan's population is still growing even though the oil patch is hurting, Premier Brad Wall says.

3,100 more residents since April, StatsCan says

Saskatchewan has added about 3,100 people since April, Statistics Canada says.

It's a good sign that Saskatchewan's population is still growing even though the oil patch is hurting, Premier Brad Wall says.

On Tuesday, Statistics Canada reported that there were 1,133,637 people living in Saskatchewan on July 1, an increase of 3,100 since April 1. For the year ending June 30, the increase was 1.0 per cent.

It's good news considering the challenges the oil industry is facing this year, Wall said.

"People continue to see Saskatchewan as a great place to work and live," Wall said in a news release. 

"This is a big change from a few years ago when a slower resource sector would invariably lead to a declining population."

Saskatchewan's population gain was made up of a natural increase (births minus deaths) of 1,641 plus net international migration of 2,903 minus net interprovincial outmigration of 1,444.

The government noted that the new population number is actually slightly lower than the number initially reported last quarter, because Statistics Canada recently revised all of its population estimates back to 2011.  

Looking at the revised numbers, Saskatchewan's population has grown in every quarter for the past nine years, the government said.

Crude oil prices have crashed in the past year, leading to layoffs in the province's oil patch and a sharp downturn in government revenues.

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