Saskatchewan

Sask. whistleblower law to take effect

Public Service Commission Minister June Draude said workers need a safe place to go with their concerns, rather than leaking problems to the media or political opposition.

Saskatchewan's new whistleblower protection law comes into force this week.

The Public Interest Disclosure Act will spell out where provincial employees should go if they suspect wrongdoing in their workplace.

Public Service Commission Minister June Draude said workers need a safe place to go with their concerns, rather than leaking problems to the media or political opposition.

"I want them to be able to go immediately and not have to think they have to stand in front of a camera or in front of anybody else and make any kind of a scene other than saying, 'There's something wrong in the workplace and I want it looked at.'"

Draude said the law will provide each ministry with a designated person to go to in the event of a complaint and eventually an independent officer will oversee it all.

The law brings Saskatchewan in line with similar whistleblower frameworks in Manitoba, Ontario and Nova Scotia.

"We're working hard to make sure that people feel that working for us in government - or in government period - is a good place to be and they are protected," said Draude.

The law, which does not allow workers to take their concerns to the media or to opposition MLAs, comes into force on Thursday.

A worker was fired last year for allegedly taking his concerns to an oppostion politician rather than the government.