Saskatchewan

Sask. casserole rallies draw hundreds

Several hundred people, including many students, in Regina and Saskatoon took to the streets to bang pots and pans in show of support for students in Quebec, who have been protesting increases in the cost of post-secondary education.

Several hundred people, including many students, in Regina and Saskatoon took to the streets to bang pots and pans in show of support for students in Quebec, who have been protesting increases in the cost of post-secondary education.

Casserole rallies — or cacerolazos — originated in Latin American countries as a form of popular protest where people bang pots and pans. The Saskatchewan rallies were among several organized in cities across Canada.

The Regina rally marched along 13th Avenue. In Saskatoon, people marched along Broadway Avenue and gathered at Rotary Park.

"The problems that are being faced by Quebec students are the problems that are being faced by students across the country," James Ford, a rally organizer in Saskatoon, told CBC News Wednesday night. "Tuition is just too high."

Students in Quebec have been engaged in various forms of protest, some violent, for more than 100 days.

The Saskatchewan students said they are also concerned about rising costs for education.

"If we want to have a well educated work force, if we want to have a healthy society, we really have to start focusing on making sure that post-secondary education is accessible," Kent Peterson, from the Canadian Federation of Students, said during the protest in Regina.

About 60 people took part in the Regina casserole.

About 200 were involved in Saskatoon.

The Quebec protests began initially in response to proposed tuition fee hikes, but they have since evolved to decry legislation that calls for heavy fines for students and their federations, and strict regulations governing demonstrations.

With files from CBC's Joana Draghici and Devin Heroux

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