Saskatchewan

Country-wide salmonella outbreak linked to sweet treats: Food Inspection Agency

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency is investigating a salmonella outbreak linked to Celebrate brand classic and egg nog flavoured profiteroles (cream puffs) and mini chocolate eclairs.

73 confirmed cases of salmonella in six provinces including B.C., Alta., Sask., Man., Ont., and Que.

Celebrate branded classical and egg nog flavoured cream puffs and mini chocolate eclairs have been recalled after being linked to a country-wide salmonella outbreak. (Submitted by Canada Food Inspection Agency)

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency is investigating a salmonella outbreak linked to Celebrate brand classic and egg nog flavoured profiteroles (cream puffs) and mini chocolate eclairs.

There have been 73 total confirmed cases of salmonella in six provinces:Saskatchewan, British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba, Ontario and Quebec. Saskatchewan has had nine reported cases.

There were 19 hospitalizations from November 2018 to late March 2019. Two deaths have been reported, however investigators have not determined whether salmonella was a contributing factor in those deaths.

Many of the people who got sick reported consuming Celebrate brand classic and egg nog flavoured cream puffs or mini chocolate eclairs before. The goods were purchased at various grocery stores across the country.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency has issued a food recall for the Celebrate brand products. The investigation is ongoing and it is possible that more products could be recalled.

"Canadians are advised to not eat any recalled Celebrate brand profiteroles and Celebrate brand mini chocolate eclairs," a news release issued by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency said.

Symptoms of salmonella start six to 72 hours after exposure to the bacteria from an infected animal or contaminated product.

Symptoms include fever, chills, diarrhea, abdominal cramps, headache, nausea and vomiting. People with weakened immune systems, infants, children and seniors are most at risk due to their fragile immune systems.

For healthy people, symptoms can last four to seven days. Salmonella can be infectious from several days to several weeks according to the food inspection agency.

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