Saskatchewan

Robert Latimer appealing travel restrictions

A Saskatchewan farmer convicted of murdering his disabled daughter is appealing a parole board decision that prevents him from travelling freely outside Canada.

Former Saskatchewan farmer, now in B.C., on parole after serving time in prison for murder

Robert Latimer was convicted of killing his severely disabled 12-year-old daughter Tracy in 1993. He was convicted in 1997 and granted full parole in 2010. (Kevin Frayer/Canadian Press)

A Saskatchewan farmer convicted of murdering his disabled daughter is appealing a parole board decision that prevents him from travelling freely outside Canada.

A Federal Court judge ruled in September there was nothing to suggest Robert Latimer is a danger and ordered the Parole Board of Canada to reconsider the case.

But in November, the board said it wouldn't lift the restriction.

Latimer's lawyer, Jason Gratl, says his client is being deprived of reasonable parole conditions.

Latimer was given a life sentence for the 1993 second-degree murder of his 12-year-old daughter, Tracy, and was released on full parole, with some conditions, in 2010.

The board denied Latimer's request in 2013 to leave Canada without first applying for a limited-time passport.

He appealed that ruling, it was upheld by the board's appeal division, and he then took his case to the Federal Court in Vancouver.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

Become a CBC Member

Join the conversation  Create account

Already have an account?

now