Saskatchewan

Regina's Eastview Community Garden: 'It's just heaven out here'

In a tightly-packed working class neighbourhood, a community garden provides a place for people to get together outside.

Immigrants and seniors build skills and friendships as gardening pulls a community together

Roselyn Veitch- smiling ear-to-ear! (Sheila Coles)

Many have agonized over how to build community.  In Regina's Eastview, a few have found the secret in a garden.

"You meet new friends. A lot of people get together and socialize", says Roselyn Veitch.

The soul cannot thrive in the absence of a garden.- Sir Thomas More

Roselyn has been there since the community garden began, some fifteen years ago.

A sunflower in Eastview Community Garden. (Sheila Coles)

It's a little oasis in this working-class neighbourhood, bordered by Regina's industrial area. It's been an enormous benefit to area residents.

Roselyn Veitch, showing off the Eastview Community Garden. (Sheila Coles)

The garden is next to a seniors' housing complex.

"Seniors look out and watch the garden grow," said Veitch. They also get together outside with each other and their families.

All tools and equipment are provided by the community centre.

It's just heaven out here.- Roselyn Veitch

The neighbourhood has a high immigrant population that benefits as well.

"We have the opportunity to produce our own fresh produce and we know how much that saves."  In addition, Veith explained, immigrants learn gardening skills and make new friends.


Sometimes strengthening a community takes a lot of cash.  And sometimes it takes a very different kind of green.

"It's just heaven out here," she said.

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