Saskatchewan

Regina police suggest $25k reward for info on unsolved homicide

A man involved in a violent drug network was found dead in Regina last August and his killing remains unsolved. Now, Regina police are suggesting a $25,000 reward to breathe life into a case growing cold.

Victim of 2016 homicide was involved in a 'violent drug network,' police say

The scene where the body of Abdisalam Dahir Nur was found in August 2016. Nur was involved in a 'violent drug network,' according to Regina police. (Brian Rodgers)

A man involved in a "violent drug network" was found dead in Regina last August and his killing remains unsolved. Now, Regina police are suggesting a $25,000 reward to breathe life into a case growing cold.

The body of Abdisalam Dahir Nur, 27, was found in a house on the 2000 block of McDonald Street, nearly 800 kilometres from Edmonton — the city he called home at the time.

That's according to a police report, which recommends the reward and will be brought before the board of police commissioners meeting on Wednesday.

Nur, who was also known as "Dame" or "Damien," and his killing are the focus of a Major Crimes Unit investigation, which continues to be held as a priority, according to the report. 

Shots ring out

Officers were sent to the scene around 5 p.m. CST on August 5, 2016. Neighbours told CBC News that they heard three or four gunshots ring out about an hour prior to the arrival of police.

The report outlines the claims of witnesses who said two men fled the scene from the back of the house and drove off in a red Jeep or SUV, which might've had an Alberta licence plate.

The Edmonton man's slaying remains unsolved, and Regina police still hold the case as a priority. A $25,000 reward is being offered for information which may lead to an arrest. (Brian Rodgers)

'Someone knows'

It goes on to say that police believe someone knows who was involved and "what actually took place" at the Regina residence, prior to Nur's death.

Several "investigative avenues have been exhausted," it reads, noting the reward money might "stimulate" someone to come forward with "crucial information" necessary to solve the case.

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