Saskatchewan

Regina Police investigation of Nadine Machiskinic's death did not meet professional standards: RCMP

An RCMP report released Thursday says the Regina Police did not meet professional standards when it investigated the sudden death of Nadine Machiskinic.

Family has been critical of Regina Police since Machiskinic found severely injured in Regina's Delta Hotel

A portrait of Nadine Machiskinic displayed at a 2017 news conference where her family called for police to reopen her case. (CBC News)

An RCMP report says the Regina Police did not meet professional standards when it investigated the sudden death of Nadine Machiskinic.

On Thursday, Regina police released a redacted copy of Independent File Review: Sudden Death Investigation of Nadine Machiskinic, a report by RCMP dated Feb. 21, 2018. The document was the subject of a freedom of information request, according to a police news release.

"The reviewers do not support the sudden death investigation of Nadine Machiskinic as meeting the standards of a professional, sudden death investigation," the report says.

The report said this finding is a direct result of the absence of a "Command Triangle" and an effective case management system to manage the investigation.

Machiskinic, an Indigenous mother of four, was found severely injured in Regina's Delta Hotel and died in hospital in January 2015.

Regina's police chief says he is confident the case was thoroughly investigated. (CBC News)

The review was conducted at the request of Regina Police Chief Evan Bray following criticism from Machiskinic's family, who have accused police of not taking her death seriously.

"The focus of this report was not to provide commentary on policy compliance or to assess the investigative theory or findings, but rather to assess the investigative process itself," reads the executive summary of the report, written by two RCMP officers.  

Bray said in the news release Thursday, released in the same email as the report, that he is confident the case was thoroughly investigated, although he acknowledged there were delays.

"Our investigation showed no evidence that someone was criminally responsible for the death of Ms. Nadine Machiskinic," said Bray.

"None of the recommendations in this review would have changed the outcome of our investigation."

Delores Stevenson, Machiskinic's aunt, had previously expressed frustrations that the findings of the report had not been released publicly.

It includes 14 recommendations for the Regina Police Service.

"Based on both the internal and external review of this case, we have been able to make positive steps in supporting our investigators on complex files, through a new Major Case Management system," said Bray.  

"This enhancement, which will be fully functional in the fall of 2019, will allow us to continue to deliver a high level of service to our community."

Chief Bray said the police service is proud of its "solid investigative track record," adding that it has some of the highest clearance rates in Western Canada.

Full report

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