Saskatchewan

Proposed changes to Sask. human rights law introduced

The Saskatchewan government has unveiled its plan to eliminate the Human Rights Tribunal and have some human rights complaints heard by the courts instead.

The Saskatchewan government has unveiled its plan to eliminate the Human Rights Tribunal and have some human rights complaints heard by the courts instead.

Amendments to the Saskatchewan Human Rights Code were introduced in the provincial legislature on Monday.

Under the current system, the Saskatchewan Human Rights Commission investigates human rights complaints and can send them on to another body, the Human Rights Tribunal, for a hearing.

The government says the tribunal will be eliminated and in the future, when a hearing is required, the case will go to the court of Queen's Bench instead.

The changes will also allow more cases to be dealt with through mediation and other alternative dispute resolution methods instead of formal hearings, the government said in a news release.

The province also plans to reduce the time allowed for people to file human rights complaints. Right now, the limitation period is two years. Under the proposed amendments, that would be cut to one year.

That change will put Saskatchewan's human rights code in line with legislation in most other provinces as well as with federal legislation, the government says.

Justice Minister Don Morgan first confirmed in the spring that the government was looking to overhaul the province's human rights legislation and eliminating the human rights tribunal was part of the plan.

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