Saskatchewan

Proposed bylaw taking 1-size-fits all approach to signs, billboards: Regina business owner

The City of Regina is reviewing a proposed bylaw change which would classify all portable signs in the city under one group.  The potential change has resulted in an opposing petition from one business owner.

Proposed bylaw would classify all portable signs as the same, which would eliminate 150 signs: Doug Hudgin

A proposed new bylaw on signs in the City of Regina would see permanent and portable signs and billboards classified as the same. (Brian Rodgers/CBC)

The City of Regina is reviewing a proposed bylaw change which would classify all portable signs in the city under one group.  

If adopted, the proposed bylaw would require that all portable signs and billboards be 30 metres from permanent billboards. Permanent billboards on the same property currently must be 90 m apart.

Doug Hudgin, president of the Regina Portable Sign Association, said the proposed new bylaw would cut at least 150 portable signs in the city due to spacing issues.  

"They grow their business, they promote business to their business and make them a destination," Hudgin said of the signs in the city.  

"So yeah, they're very crucial to a lot of people."

Doug Hudgin is in the sign businesses, both as a seller and as a representative. Hudgin said the new bylaw would eliminate at least 150 signs from the City of Regina. He has started a petition in opposition. (Brian Rodgers/CBC)

Hudgin is the owner of Classic Signage, a business which rents out portable signs and billboards in Regina. He said there were 530 portable signs in the city in 2018.

Hudgin said smaller portable signs on private property are being regulated unfairly. In protest, he has created an online petition.

The city said the rules have been simplified based on feedback from stakeholders within the sign industry.

Hudgin says the city gives businesses with permanent billboards and bus benches preferential treatment, some which pay to use city property.

"One of the billboard providers also owns the bus benches which are on city property and leased from the city. So is there a double standard and a conflict of interest? Absolutely," said Hudgin.

Portable billboards must be located a minimum of 45 metres from another portable billboard. Portable billboards can be no closer than 30 metres to permanent billboards on the same side of the street. (City of Regina)

The city said it's aware of the petition and is discussing outstanding concerns with people who are part of the sign industry.

"The proposed sign regulations help ensure that all signs are constructed and displayed in a manner that is safe and minimizes negative impacts to the esthetic quality of streets," the city said in an emailed statement.

Portable signs used for on-site advertising are considered secondary signs. One secondary sign is permitted per lot line touching a street. Additional signs must be 90 metres apart.

Portable billboards must be located a minimum of 45 metres from another portable billboard. Portable billboards can be no closer than 30 metres to permanent billboards on the same side of the street.

About the Author

Alex Soloducha is a reporter for CBC Saskatchewan.

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