Saskatchewan

Nude man bites police dog after wild car chase

A man who tangled with a police dog in Prince Albert following a wild car chase is facing a number of charges, including animal cruelty. Police say he was nude at the time of the encounter.

Police say Prince Albert man was under the influence of drugs

Police dog Jagger, from the Prince Albert Police Service's canine unit, seen here from training days. (CBC)

A man who tangled with a police dog in Prince Albert following a wild car chase is facing a number of charges, including animal cruelty. Police say he was nude at the time of the encounter.

The bizarre episode took place early Tuesday, around 2:30 a.m. CST, when police were dispatched to an area known as Little Red Park to deal with what was described as a family dispute.

When officers arrived there they were told a man, under the influence of drugs, had taken off in a Honda Civic.

Patrol units spotted the suspect and tried to stop him, but the driver took off and made a number of dangerous moves to avoid police.

The suspect then tried to drive out of town but, due to excessive speed, lost control of the car and hit a ditch.

The man inside jumped out and started running, naked, away from pursuing officers.

A K-9 unit was on the scene and the police dog was able to track down the suspect.

But during that encounter police said there was a struggle and police say their dog was assaulted.

"He did receive injuries," Sgt. Brandon Mudry, a spokesman for the Prince Albert police, told CBC News. "As I understand it, he received a bite and was punched."

Mudry added that the police dog, Jagger, was OK.

The suspect was finally arrested, taken to hospital to be examined, and then charged.

Police said a 20-year-old man will be in court on charges of dangerous operation of a motor vehicle, failing to stop for police, resist arrest and cruelty to animals.

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