Saskatchewan·Audio

'Getting hurt, it's just a part of the game': Millennial dating panel talks hookups, romance, marriage

Millennials talk dating, love, romance and how having so much choice isn't always a good thing.

Samantha Topp, Tatenda Chikukwa, Berke McClintock talk being in their 20s and dating

There's so much choice, if the going gets tough another person is a swipe away, according to the Morning Edition's dating panel. (Getty Images)

Millennial dating in 2018 is different than previous generations. Tinder is not about camp fires and texting is more common than a phone call. There's so much choice, if the going gets tough another person is a swipe away. 

Three young people in their 20s sat down with Zarqa Nawaz, host of CBC Radio's The Morning Edition, to talk about dating in Regina.

Samantha Topp, Tatenda Chikukwa and Berke McClintock are all currently single and share their experience. 

In part one, the trio discuss hook-ups and the means to get there, including apps and texting. 

"Having romantic interaction at your fingertips is again way more accessible than it used to be," said Topp.

In part two, the three talk romance and intimacy in the long term and why some millennials have a different view on marriage. 

"There's nothing to look forward to," said Chikukwa about the hook-up and move on culture. 

About the Author

Heidi Atter

AP/Journalist

Heidi Atter is a journalist working in Regina. She started with CBC Saskatchewan after a successful internship and has a passion for character-driven stories. Heidi has worked as a reporter, web writer, associate producer and show director so far, and has worked in Edmonton, at the Wainwright military base, and in Adazi, Latvia. Story ideas? Email heidi.atter@cbc.ca.

With Files from CBC Saskatchewan's Morning Edition

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