Saskatchewan·Photos

Moose Jaw man placing flowers and funny signs in potholes

"Have you driven in Moose Jaw?" That is how Clayton Clysdale Finnell responds when people ask why he's started placing flowers and funny signs in potholes throughout Moose Jaw.

Clayton Clysdale Finnell wants people to come together to fix this problem

      1 of 0

      "Have you driven in Moose Jaw?"

      That is how Clayton Clysdale Finnell responds when people ask why he's started placing flowers and funny signs in potholes throughout Moose Jaw.

      The whole thing is just getting the city to talk and say it's time for a plan.- Clayton Clysdale Finnell explaining why he's planting flowers in potholes throughout Moose Jaw.

      It started with the occasional funny sign and pylon. "Need a vacation. Jump in. Next stop, China," placed beside a pothole proved to be quite popular. Then Finnell started a Facebook page that gathered plenty of likes.

      Fuelled with confidence, Finnell took his frustration with Moose Jaw's streets to the next level by incorporating some flower power.

      "The whole thing is just getting the city to talk and say it's time for a plan. That's my biggest reason for doing this is because we don't have a plan," Finnell told The Morning Edition's Stefani Langenegger.  

      There are now flowers and hand-drawn chalk monsters, as Finnell describes them, highlighting some of Moose Jaw's worst potholes. 

      Finnell is now switching to chalk monsters to grab the city's attention. (Photo courtesy of Clayton Clysdale Finnell.)

      Finnel said the feedback from people has been great because potholes is an issue that impacts everyone. 

      "Even if you're a little kid, you're affected. My daughters can't even use their scooters on the roads here."

      So far this spring, Finnell has made six signs, planted close to 20 flowers and drawn between 30 and 40 pothole monsters throughout Moose Jaw. 

      Finnell realizes the city is doing their best to fix the problem. So far, city crews have fixed 23 of the potholes he's decorated.

      However, Finnell said there are simply too many potholes for city crews to fix. That's why he would love to see a community pothole week where everyone gets together and co-fills all the potholes in side streets.

      A world free of potholes, Finnell said, would be a beautiful place.

      "Can you imagine just going outside and your coffee is going to taste that much better. The air is going to be that much better because everyone would be a much happier mood."

        

      Comments

      To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

      By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.