'More than a game' for 100-year-old Marysburg Royals baseball team

For as long as there’s been a Marysburg Royals baseball team, Brent Puetz has had a family member playing for the team. But he said it's more than a love of the sport itself that has brought Marysburg Royals together for the past 100 years — it's the community connection.

Hamlet with handful of residents throws celebration to mark a century of baseball

The Marysburg Royals have fielded a team for the last 100 years, with the Royals hosting a celebration of the past century over the weekend. (Marysburg Royals/Facebook)

For as long as there's been a Marysburg Royals baseball team, Brent Puetz has had a family member playing for the team.

But he said it's more than a love of the sport itself that has brought Marysburg Royals together for the past 100 years — it's the team's close connection.

"Everybody's family, we're all friends and that's the part that's really kept the team together for all these years," he told CBC Saskatchewan's Afternoon Edition.

"It's more than just a game."

On the past weekend, the Marysburg Royals Senior Baseball team hosted a 100th anniversary celebration, with current players and old-timers coming out for the celebration.

At 91 years old, Arnold Strueby was the oldest player able to attend, showing the youngsters how it was done by throwing out the first pitch of the weekend in the Royals' game against the Saskatoon Stallions.

For the Marysburg Royals' weekend celebration, 91-year-old Arnold Strueby tossed out the first pitch. (Marysburg Royals/Facebook)

Baseball has been a common denominator for generations of players living in the small hamlet, located about 120 kilometres east of Saskatoon, according to Puetz.

"If you're from Marysburg, we just grew up playing baseball and that was about it for the summer months," he said.

His own grandfather played back in 1918, with his father then stepping up to the plate. When he was growing up, Puetz began playing with his other friends that also loved the sport, with he and others sticking with it through the years.

Just when he was thinking of taking a break, Puetz's three-year-old son started saying he wanted to play baseball too.

"When you hear that, it kind of got the fire burning again," Puetz said, adding he'll stick with it for now, so his son has memories of his father playing the game that continues to bring Marysburg residents together, year after year.

"It gives a guy a lot of sense of pride looking back, that's for sure."

with files from CBC's The Afternoon Edition