Man, dog duo miss attempt at breaking Frisbee world record in Regina

It was a narrow miss for Rob McLeod and his dog, Davy the whippet, who set out to break their own world record for throwing and catching a flying disc in Regina on Saturday.

Throwing and catching record remains 10.56 seconds

Davy the whippet resting after 15 tries at beating the record on Saturday. (CBC News/Alex Soloducha)

It was a narrow miss for Rob McLeod and his dog, Davy the whippet, who set out to break their own world record for throwing and catching a flying disc in Regina on Saturday.

McLeod, who's also known as "Frisbee Rob," was at Douglas Park at noon attempting to best the current Guinness canine MTA — or "maximum time aloft" — record, which he and Davy previously set at 10.56 seconds.

To break the record — which is also a World Flying Disc Federation record — McLeod was aiming for the longest throw that Davy was still able to catch.

The pair were unsuccessful due to wind, with gusts up to 63 km/h Saturday, according to Environment Canada. 

Davy nabbed one catch out of 15 tries allowed, but McLeod said they will attempt to beat the record again on Monday afternoon.

"Every time we fail it's like, 'OK, what can we learn from today?' Obviously today it's conditions but there were some throws that I had, so it's 'how can I figure out how to throw a little better in these conditions as well?'"
Rob McLeod and his dog, Davy the whippet, set the current record for throwing and catching a disc in 2014. They failed to break it on Saturday, but plan to try again on Monday. (CBC News/Alex Soloducha)

In total, McLeod gets 15 throw attempts each time he tries to set a new record.

"Otherwise you could go for 50 or 60 attempts and that's not safe for the dog at all," he said.

The record is determined by three timers measuring the total time from when McLeod releases the disc to when Davy catches it.

McLeod and Davy, from Calgary, Alta., set the current record on Oct. 12, 2014. The previous record of 10.14 seconds was set in 2003.
McLeod and Davy, from Calgary, Alta., hold the current Guinness canine MTA — or 'maximum time aloft' — record. (CBC News/Alex Soloducha)

Although McLeod had already secured six Guinness World Records, this is the first time he's attempted to break one of his own records.

"I love challenging myself but he's turning nine in November," McLeod said. "You never know how much time he has left, so while he's healthy and active I want to do as much with him as I can," he said.

With files from Jill Morgan