Lost teddy explores the Royal Sask. Museum, searches for owner

The Royal Saskatchewan Museum has a new, temporary resident: a lost teddy bear looking for its owner.

Toddler lost the bear after T-Rex exhibit scare

The Royal Saskatchewan Museum is using social media to find this lost teddy bear's rightful owner. A young boy apparently left him at the museum after getting a scare from T-Rex exhibit Megamunch. (Submitted by Royal Saskatchewan Museum)

Whether it's the neolithic age or Indigenous round dancing, one forgotten teddy bear is getting a crash course in world history, all thanks to social media and staff at the Royal Saskatchewan Museum.  

On June 23, staff at the museum noticed one little boy running out of the T-Rex exhibit that houses museum mainstay Megamunch. 

The boy was crying and frightened after encountering the looming dinosaur. 

A gallery interpreter tried to comfort him, assuring him his teddy bear would help.

Later that day, museum staff found the the snuggly keepsake in the men's washroom, apparently forgotten by the boy. They've been trying to find its family since then. 

Gallery interpreter Jenna Cannon said she and her colleagues decided to use social media to put out some feelers to find the bear's family. 

Using the hastage #LostBear on Twitter, museum staff have documented all the bear's explorations of the museum. 

"My boss was like, 'wouldn't be it kind of cute if we took some pictures of the bear having adventures in our museum?'"said Cannon.

"Normally whatever gets lost, we go through it eventually and end up donating it," she said. 

Staff at the museum hope that's not the case with this particular item.

The Royal Saskatchewan Museum is using social media to find this lost teddy bear's rightful owner. A young boy apparently left him at the museum after getting a scare from T-Rex exhibit Megamunch. The bear took to exploring the museum. (Submitted by Royal Saskatchewan Museum)

"I think the little boy is missing him a lot more than I'll be when he leaves," Cannon said. 

Until that happens, his learning and adventures continue. 

Cannon encouraged people to keep tweeting and sharing the bear's adventures throughout the museum, in hopes of reaching his four or five-year-old owner. 

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