Saskatchewan

U of R to bid adieu to 'Language Institute Building' name

The University of Regina is going to rename the Language Institute Building, because it wants the name to better reflect what happens there.

A new name will emphasize how the building has evolved, says the chair of the renaming committee

The University of Regina says it will rename the Language Institute Building because it wants to better reflect all of the French language programming that takes place within the centre. (Getty Images)

The University of Regina says it will rename the Language Institute Building.

The school says the new name will better reflect what happens at the learning centre. 

"The more provocative way to cast it or describe the process is to say oh, the name is not french enough," said Emmanuel Aito, the director of La Cité Universitaire Francophone and the chair of the renaming committee. 

"A more realistic perspective is ​to admit that the activities in the building have evolved." 

People used to only study the French language in the building, but now it has become a hub where people can study all disciplines in French. 

"There's been tremendous diversification of our programming and we have lots of social, cultural linguistic activities also that benefit the Francophone community." 

Aito said there are French courses offered in Indigenous studies, philosophy, mathematics and sciences.  

A new name will better reflect the programming that happens in the Language Institute, said Emmanuel Aito, chair of the renaming committee for the building. (CBC) (Submitted by University of Regina)

The building's origins date back to 1988, when the federal and provincial governments committed to supporting minority French education in Saskatchewan.

Ten million was invested for the construction of the new Language Institute Building on the main campus. It was to be used primarily for French language instruction and its doors opened in 1991, according to the university. 

Have your say

The University of Regina has asked people to help come up with a new name while keeping the following criteria in mind. 

  • Names should describe the building, function, location or usage.
  • Names cannot be of individuals.
  • Names should represent the University and community.
  • Names should not infringe on existing trademarks.
  • Submissions must include a 70-word rationale.
  • Names should consider the academic units and other organizations housed in the building, including La Cité Universitaire Francophone, the Faculty of Education (BAC Program), the Centre for Continuing Education (ESL Program), and a residence.

Ideas can be submitted via an online survey that closes December 19. 

"It's a very democratized process," Aito said. 

The Language Institute Building's renaming committee will then make recommendations to university president Vianne Timmons, who will make the final choice.

Aito said they hope to have their recommendations to Timmons in the early new year. 

with files from the Morning Edition