K-Lane kennel goes green with geo-thermal and solar systems

A dog kennel in rural Saskatchewan is using geo-thermal and solar energy systems to reduce its paw-print on the environment.

Power from the sun, warmth from the earth

CBC reporter Adrian Cheung, with Speck, at the K-Lane kennels southeast of Regina. (CBC)
K-Lane Kennels is hoping newly installed solar panels will generate enough energy to power circulating pumps for their geo-thermal heating system. (CBC)
A dog kennel in rural Saskatchewan is using geo-thermal and solar energy systems to reduce its paw-print on the environment.

Louise and Dan Yates operate K-Lane kennels, in Kronau, Sask., about 25 kilometres southeast of Regina.

They use a geo-thermal system for heating and solar powers for electricity.

"It's just the right thing to do," Louise Yates explained. "It's good for the dogs. It's good for the environment. [And] it makes sense financially, if you're looking at things in the long term."

With room for around 50 animals, the kennel's power and heating bills can quickly add up.

"The dogs go in and out [and] all the heat goes out the dog door," she said. "So heating and electrical is
quite a big cost to running a commercial boarding kennel."

To offset the electricity used by the circulating pumps for their heating system, they have 190 solar energy panels.

"If the electricity costs go up next year ... it's really not going to affect us very much because we're generating our own electricity with the solar panels," Dan Yates noted. The operation was also able to use a SaskPower incentive program which provides a rebate for 20 per cent of the cost of solar panel installation.

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