Saskatchewan

'They'll decide when the teepees come down,' says FSIN chief of protesters

Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations executives visited the Justice for Our Stolen Children camp on Thursday afternoon. Chief Bobby Cameron said they were there to get guidance and direction from the people at the camp.

FSIN leaders visited Justice for Our Stolen Children camp Thursday

The Justice for Our Stolen Children camp began with one teepee. It has since grown to 15. (Kirk Fraser/CBC)

Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations executives visited the Justice for Our Stolen Children camp on Thursday afternoon.

Chief Bobby Cameron said they were there to get guidance and direction from the people at the camp.

"We're here to support any way we can," he said.

"We support them 100 per cent and wholeheartedly because every one of us has family members or someone close to us who has fallen through the cracks of the justice system and the child welfare system."

FSIN Chief Bobby Cameron says the end goal is to create "positive change that will meet and reflect our First Nations perspective.” (CBC News)

On Tuesday, the camp outlined requests for the government, which include a moratorium on adoptions and a review of permanent and long-term wards of social services in the province.

Cameron said they need to see action on every item on the list.

"We've lost too many of our folks to the justice system. There's so many of our First Nation people that are incarcerated. We've lost so many of our young men and boys within the provincial child welfare system."

The camp was set up in Regina more than 120 days ago and began with one teepee outside the Legislature.

It has since grown to 12 teepees. On Thursday, a 13th teepee was under construction.

Campers met with government officials on Monday. The next meeting is scheduled to happen in two weeks.

"They'll decide when and if the teepees will come down," Cameron said of the protestors.