Saskatchewan

Foster kids no longer housed in Regina hotels: Social services

The Ministry of Social Services says that an emergency plan was put in place to relocate the children housed in Regina hotels to other forms of foster care.

Government spokesperson says emergency plan implemented to deal with high volume of children in care

Saskatchewan's Ministry of Social Services says that children in foster care are no longer being housed in Regina hotels. The ministry has seen a spike in children coming into care. (Shutterstock)

The Ministry of Social Services has put an emergency plan in place to remove foster children from Regina hotels.

A government spokesperson said in an e-mailed statement on Saturday that there are no longer any children staying in the hotels as a form of foster care.

The spokesperson said that an "emergency contingency resource" was implemented on Friday to respond to the high volume of calls regarding children coming into care.

This means that all of the children previously cared for in hotels are now with family, extended family, foster homes or group homes, according to the statement. 

The ministry could not provide additional information until Monday.

At the beginning of June, Saskatchewan children's advocate, Bob Pringle, said that there is a "looming crisis" in the foster care system.

Pringle's comments came after it was revealed that 13 foster kids were staying at Regina hotels one night that week.

The ministry attributed this to the spike in children coming into care.

Last May, the ministry apprehended 55 children, which is more than double the amount during the same period a year prior.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.