Saskatchewan

Film based on Schneeberger airing as parole begins

A former physician from Kipling convicted of drugging and sexually assaulting his patients is expected to be released from prison just in time to see a movie based on his story on a U.S. movie network.

A former physician from Kipling convicted of drugging and sexually assaulting his patients is expected to be released from prison just in time to see a movie based on his story on a U.S. movie network.

John Schneeberger, who was convicted in 1999, is being released in Regina later this week after serving two-thirds of his six-year sentence for sexually assaulting two patients.

His bizarre attempt to cover up the act with an elaborate blood exchange aimed at thwarting DNA tests forms the central dramatic device in a movie being broadcast Sunday evening on Movie Central.

I Accuse, traces the courageous battle that a woman engaged in getting her family physician charged and convicted of sexually assaulting her in a small rural town.

"I told you, he drugged me. He's a doctor," says actor Estella Warren while playing the doctor's victim.

Warren plays the small-town girl convinced she was drugged and assaulted by a respected local doctor. The film portrays her during the years she spent pursuing the matter against a backdrop of denials and small-town infighting over her allegations.

In the film nobody believes her story and when blood tests come back negative and it appears the small-town physician is innocent, his victim courageously fights on.

"There are many people out there who are up against tough things in their lives," says the film's director and producer John Ketcham. "They know the truth. If they have the integrity to stick with something, that truth will eventually be seen."

Ketcham says the dramatic high point of the movie comes when the doctor reveals how he thwarted the blood tests.

"I created a small tube filled with someone else's blood," says the actor playing the physician."I sealed it a both ends. I would beat her at her own game."

The movie was made in Saskatchewan and the real-life victim was a paid consultant on the project. She worked closely with Warren to make the character as realistic as possible.

Corrections officials say that Schneeberger plans to live in Regina, but has been ordered to not have any contact with his victims. His license to practice medicine was revoked after he was found guilty of his crimes.

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