Saskatchewan

Family of wolf-attack victim waiting for answers

The family of a young man who died after an apparent wolf attack in northern Saskatchewan is angry and demanding answers about how it could have happened.

The family of a young man who died after an apparent wolf attack in northern Saskatchewan is angry and demanding answers about how it could have happened.

Kenton Carnegie of Oshawa, Ont., died at Points North Landing four months ago, while he was on a university work term.

The engineering student may be the first person in North America to be killed by wild wolves in their natural habitat.

The local coroner, Rosalie Tsannie, has no doubt wolves are to blame for the Nov. 8, 2005, death and she talked about the case at the scene where Carnegie's body was found – near Points North Landing about 750 kilometres northeast of Saskatoon.

"Based on the tracks and activity and blood around here this is where the wolves had taken him down," she said.

However, it's the government's chief coroner who has the final say on the cause of death and four months after Carnegie was killed, the province isn't saying what happened.

"I think that we really need to wait for the coroner's report to understand the circumstances and what the cause of death really is," said Environment Department deputy minister Lily Stonehouse.

The lack of information is infuriating, according to Kenton Carnegie's father, Kim.

He thinks his son's death may have been preventable, and is demanding change.

CBC News has learned that wolves are drawn to Points North by an unregulated dump.

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It's an easy meal for wolves, but brings the predator and humans together.

Carnegie believes it created a very dangerous situation for his son.

"My worst-case scenario is that his life and his death are going to go unnoticed and nothing is going to change, and that would be a waste," he said.

So far, Carnegie's death hasn't led to change at the mining supply camp.

The landfill is still unregulated. And there are fresh wolf tracks everywhere.