Saskatchewan

Even 100% electric cars cause greenhouse gases, City of Regina report says

Electric cars might be a lot cleaner than gasoline-power vehicles, but they still create carbon emissions, a City of Regina report says.

Delegate to City Council urges city to do more to promote electric

Even 100 per cent electric cars are responsible for some greenhouse gas emissions, a City of Regina report says. (Blair Sanderson)

Electric cars might be a lot cleaner than gasoline-power vehicles, but they still create carbon emissions, a City of Regina report says.
  
Regina city council is meeting tonight and one of the items on the agenda is charging stations for electric cars.

A report says the city could install public charging stations, but it could cost $26,000 to install three of them.

That might be too much, considering there are only five completely electric vehicles in Regina, it says.

The report, prepared by city staff, also notes that greenhouse gases are still created with electric vehicles.

Generating one kilowatt-hour of electricity in Saskatchewan produces the equivalent of 0.63 kilograms of carbon dioxide.

That's higher than the national average of 0.16 kilograms per kilowatt-hour.

In both cases, gasoline vehicles generate far more of the greenhouse gases linked to climate change: 2.72 kilograms of CO2 per gallon burned, the report says.

Council is expected to hear from a member of the public, John Klein, who says in a letter that the city should be doing more to make itself electric-car friendly.

"If coal electricity is a concern, realize that solar power can be added soon after and the electricity
provided will be as green as possible, something gasoline vehicles can't easily be converted to
make use of," Klein said.

That meeting starts at 5:30 p.m. CST.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.