Saskatchewan

COVID-19 in Sask.: Test positivity rate at 27.6%

Saskatchewan now has 5,235 confirmed active cases after the province reported a record 913 new cases from testing centres across the province.

'This is not the time for any gatherings,' says Saskatchewan chief medical health officer

Saskatchewan daily test positivity rate for COVID-19 was 27.6 per cent on Thursday. (Jeff McIntosh/The Canadian Press)

The fifth wave of the pandemic has led to a new flood of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Saskatchewan, with more than a quarter of the people who receive PCR testing in the past day coming back as positive.

On Thursday, the province reported a 27.6 per cent positivity rate for the past day, with a daily record 913 new cases from 3,307 tests. Saskatoon had almost half of the confirmed new cases with 432.

"This is not the time for any gatherings," said Saskatchewan chief medical health officer Saqib Shahab at a COVID-19 update Thursday afternoon.

Saskatchewan is the only province that does not have any gathering limits.

The province now has 5,235 confirmed active cases. The seven-day average of new cases stands at 597. Those numbers don't include people who have had positive home rapid tests but not confirmed with PCR testing, and others who carry the virus but aren't showing any symptoms.

One more person has died, bringing the total number of COVID-related deaths in the province to 961.

LISTEN | Saskatoon Morning host Leisha Grebinski talks with Dr. Raj Bhardwaj about the latest on the Omicron variant 

Despite the record number of new cases, hospitalizations were down Thursday.

There were 100 people in hospital with COVID-19, down six from Wednesday. Twelve of those patients are in intensive care.

The province said 39 of the COVID-19 cases in hospital are incidental. These are asymptomatic patients who came in for other things and tested positive when screened for COVID-19.

About 84 per cent of the people five and older have had their first vaccine dose and 76 per cent of that group are fully vaccinated.

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