Saskatchewan

'Die-in' staged at legislature as Sask. joins Global Climate Strike

Members of the solar power industry and their families joined youth from across the province on Friday as part of the Global Climate Strike.

Legislature in Regina, city hall in Saskatoon ground zero for Friday climate rallies

Climate protesters hold a 'die-in' outside the legislature in Regina. (Kirk Fraser/CBC)

Members of the solar power industry and their families joined youth from across the province on Friday as part of the Global Climate Strike.

Hundreds in Regina and Saskatoon came out for Fridays For Future, part of a global initiative to increase awareness of climate change. Earlier in the day in Montreal, well-known environmental activist Greta Thunberg spoke at a rally in Montreal as part of mass demonstrations across the world.

The march in Regina closed down traffic on Albert Street from 20th Avenue to College Avenue starting at 9:30 a.m. CST., as people walked between the Royal Saskatchewan Museum and the Saskatchewan Legislative Building.

Accompanying speeches in front of the legislature was a "die-in" where young people played dead and left their chalk outlines on the front steps.

Organizer Ada Dechene said seeing the event come together was fun.

"It was much, much larger than I expected," the 13-year-old said. 

She said humans are approaching a point of no return if action isn't taken now.

"Me and my friends will be affected by climate change if it's not fixed. We need to fix it as soon as possible."

Hunter Reavley, 17, said her science teacher denied climate change that morning, and told her she shouldn't go to the protest. 

"I was just shocked. I was in awe. Teachers are supposed to be the ones who advocate for our world," she said.

Premier Scott Moe did not attend the event.

"I just hope that, even though we aren't the premier's demographic voters, that he will take into account what we are doing here today," 16-year-old Taylor Hennessey said. 

"I would like to be acknowledged at least by the premier that he hears us and that he is willing to make a change."

The day was scheduled to wrap up with a Festival For Future and EcoScience Fair at the Artesian at 7 p.m.

Protesters taking part in the Global Climate Strike march to the legislature in Regina. (Bonnie Allen/CBC)

Saskatoon joins in

In Saskatoon, cyclists from across the city rode to city hall, where Climate Strike events began at noon.

The cyclists, who took a route from the Bike Doctor on Main Street down Broadway Avenue, called their ride Rolling Out For Climate Action.

Hundreds of people in Saskatoon came out for the rally. (Courtney Markewich/CBC)

Even before it started, a group of young girls stood at the city square intersection, chanting messages such as, "Hey, ho, climate change, you must go!"

People rallied, marched to the provincial cabinet office and Federal Building to call for climate action at all levels of government, then returned to city hall.

The event wrapped up with speeches and music.

Grade 7 student Hazel DeClerq said she felt it was important to show support.

"It's ... not fair that I have to come out today. I think it's ridiculous that this is happening," she said.

"Like Greta said, the signs have been clear for 30 years. It's not fair."

People in Saskatoon marching. (Courtney Markewich/CBC)

With files from David Shield and Emily Pasiuk

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