Saskatchewan

Artist in residence shack: bringing art to the people

It’s a summertime staple in downtown Regina, and Dunlop Art Gallery’s way of bringing art to the people — it’s an artist in residence shack that sits outside the main branch of the Regina Public Library.

It's not another food stall in Regina's downtown area, it's an artist in residence shack

Faith B. Logan was the artist in residence at the art shack outside the main branch of the Regina Public Library from July 18 - July 22. She created an art installation in the shack out of paper cut outs and drapery imitating an underwater sea environment. (Facebook)

It's a summertime staple in downtown Regina, and Dunlop Art Gallery's way of bringing art to the people — it's an artist in residence shack that sits outside the main branch of the Regina Public Library.

Every week this summer a different artist settles in the shack to make some art while interacting with passersby.

"I guess it's like the child in me who always has wanted the best ultimate fort," said Wendy Peart, Dunlop Art Gallery's curator of education and community outreach.

"This is that coming out in me, just this strong desire to see some fun come to the outdoor spaces of our city."

Peart works to select artists to take up residency in the shack to work with the community.

Artists taking up residency

She said that two years ago it started when she contacted local artist, Heather Cline. Cline worked with students from Mother Teresa Middle School in Regina to design and construct the art shack.

Peart said that the shack works well for artists who thrive through interaction. She said many artists who worked in the shack said that they got more done in this environment.

"Sometimes the studio is a lonely place," she said. "Some artists love being able to talk with people about their work, and to see what excites them."

Many artists also like to have passersby participate in the creative process — like Charline P. William, who worked in the shack until Friday. She included the community by integrating Pokemon Go into her practice as players were passing by.

For the first weeks of August, the Dunlop's education assistant will be in the shack doing "art shack shimmies", as Peart calls them. That's when anyone of any age can come by the shack and create art.

"We want to extend beyond our gallery space and go towards the people, rather than always try to entice them in."

Artists are in the shack most weekdays throughout the summer.

With files from CBC Radio's Saskatchewan Weekend

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