Saskatchewan

10th anniversary of Sask. gay marriage decision

It's the anniversary of an important chapter in civil rights today — 10 years since a Saskatchewan judge declared that same-sex marriages are legal.

5 same-sex couples challenged law in 2004

Same-sex marriage became legal in Saskatchewan following a Nov. 5, 2004 ruling from Queen's Bench Justice Donna Wilson. (CBC)

It's the anniversary of an important chapter in civil rights today — 10 years since a Saskatchewan judge declared that same-sex marriages are legal.

In 2004, after five same-sex couples were denied licences to marry by a marriage licence issuer, they went to the courts to overturn that decision.  

It turned out there wasn't much of a fight — the attorneys general of both Saskatchewan and the federal government didn't oppose the application.

On Nov. 5, 2004, Queen's Bench Justice Donna Wilson ruled that marriage is “the lawful union of two persons to the exclusion of all others” and civil marriage between two persons of the same sex is "lawful and valid" in Saskatchewan.

Wilson also declared that under Saskatchewan's human rights legislation, it's illegal for public officials to deny marriage licences to gay couples.

Federal law establishing that same-sex marriages are legal came into effect in 2005. 


On mobile? Here's a link to our poll on the 10th anniversary of the same-sex marriage decision.

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