Canada

Rothstein confirmed as Supreme Court judge

Marshall Rothstein will be Canada's newest Supreme Court judge, Prime Minister Stephen Harper confirmed on Wednesday.

Marshall Rothstein will be Canada's newest Supreme Court judge, Prime Minister Stephen Harper confirmed on Wednesday.

"On reflection, this was an easy decision to make and I'm confident that Justice Rothstein will make an excellent addition to the Supreme Court of Canada," said Harper in the foyer of the House of Commons.

Rothstein will be formally sworn in as a Supreme Court judge within weeks, but a final date hasn't been set, said Supreme Court executive legal officer Nancy Brooks. He is expected to take part in the court's spring session, which begins April 10.

He will replace Justice John Major, who retired in December.

Rothstein made history on Monday when he was questioned by an all-party committee of MPs during a publicly televised hearing. He is the first such nominee to undergo a public review by members of Parliament.

Harper retained the power to make the final decision, leaving MPs with no authority to quash the nomination.

Rothstein, 65, was appointed to the Federal Court in 1992 by then prime minister Brian Mulroney and elevated to the Federal Court of Appeal by Jean Chrétien.

Well-connected in Tory circles, Rothstein was included on a short list prepared for the former Liberal government by members of the parties in 2005.

Born in Winnipeg on Dec. 25, 1940, he married Sheila Dorfman of Montreal in 1966. They have four children.

Rothstein has also lectured in law at the University of Manitoba. One of his former students, Vic Toews, is now Canada's justice minister.