PEI

Silent march against family violence marks 8th year across P.E.I.

People gathered across the Island today to march in honour of Family Violence Prevention Week, an initiative that aims to bring awareness to domestic violence.

'We still need to try and prevent it because it's still happening'

People gathered in Charlottetown to march against family violence. Staff at P.E.I. Family and Human services say they receive thousands of phone calls a year regarding domestic abuse and child protection. (Nicole Williams/CBC)

People gathered across the Island Wednesday to march in honour of Family Violence Prevention Week, an initiative that aims to bring awareness to domestic violence.

Marchers wore purple, the official colour of family violence prevention. (Nicole Williams/CBC)

'It's often something that's very silent'

"It just raises the issue in people's minds because it's often something that's very silent, and not really talked about," said Danya O'Malley, executive director of P.E.I. family violence prevention services.

This year's march emphasized the importance of involving both genders in the conversation about domestic abuse. (Nicole Williams/CBC)

Marchers gathered at several locations across the Island today — including Charlottetown, Montague, Lennox Island and Summerside.

Marches took place across the Island including Charlottetown, Montague, Lennox Island and this one in Summerside. (Nicole Williams/CBC)

Marchers wearing purle

Tina Mundy, minister of Family and Human Services, said these marches are an important way of moving the conversation about domestic abuse forward.

Tina Mundy (middle), Minister of Family and Human Services and P.E.I. Premier Wade MacLauchlan lead the silent march in Charlottetown. (Nicole Williams/CBC)

In Charlottetown, marchers adorned in purple made way their from Province House to City Hall.

The annual march is in its 8th year and its most recent message is to get everyone involved in the conversation.

'I'm going to lead by example'

'We need to see more men get involved in events like this and come on board with the walk and realize I'm sending a message and I'm going to lead by example,' says Gordon McNeilly of ManUp P.E.I. (Nicole Williams/CBC)

"We need to see more men get involved in events like this and come on board with the walk and realize 'I'm sending a message and I'm going to lead by example,'" said Gordon McNeilly, of ManUp P.E.I.

Organizers said anyone in or who knows of an abusive relationship should visit the Premier's Action Committee on Family Violence website.

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