PEI

Y's Men's not getting down over vandalism

Volunteers with the Y's Men's food drive are staying positive despite some negative activity around their major food drive.

Signs from the food drive were torn up and vandalized

Sticky notes with profanity were attached to the signs. CBC has blurred the profanity. (Submitted by Shannon Pratt)

Volunteers with the Y's Men's food drive are staying positive despite some negative activity around their major food drive.

The drive took place Monday night, but earlier that day some of their signs in East Royalty went missing. When they were found an organizer noticed a sticky note attached to them with a nasty message including a profanity.

Halbert Pratt is with the drive. He said this is the only time he's ever seen anything like it. 

Halbert Pratt with the Charlottetown Y's Men's club says he doesn't understand why someone would do something like this (Natalia Goodwin/CBC)

"First time I've ever heard of it and I've only been at it 12 to 15 years, but this is the first time for me that I've heard of any kind of negativity," he said.

"It may be somebody just, I don't know, pulling a prank they thought, or venting out or something I don't know. It's beyond me on that one. We'll just keep right on going. "

The drive celebrated its 30th anniversary Monday night. Each year hundreds of volunteers go door to door in Charlottetown and Cornwall collecting around 20 tonnes of food for the Upper Room Food Bank.

Pratt said with all the good the drive does he just doesn't get why someone would do what they did to the signs.

Two recovered signs share space with piles of donated food. (Natalia Goodwin/CBC)

Pratt said the team is focusing on the positive instead. He got more volunteers out than expected and the food was flowing in. He thinks the incident being in the news and being posted on social media may bring more good than bad in the end.

"I'm sure there'll probably be some more positivity that comes out and may help us towards next year," he said.

"The demand seems to be getting greater than going down. And that's why we're still around 30 years later."

Pratt doubts the organization will go to the police as the signs were not damaged.

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