PEI

Where you will — and won't — need to show proof of vaccination on P.E.I.

P.E.I.’s Vax Pass policy comes into effect Oct. 5, which means some businesses, services and events are required to verify a person’s proof of vaccination for access to their venue or setting. 

P.E.I. Vax Pass policy begins Oct. 5

Beginning Oct. 5, moviegoers 12 and older will have to show proof of vaccination. (Brian McInnis/CBC)

P.E.I.'s Vax Pass policy comes into effect Oct. 5, which means some businesses, services and events are required to verify a person's proof of vaccination for access to their venue or setting. 

Children under 12 are exempt because they are currently not eligible to be vaccinated.

Failure to follow the Public Health Order may result in a fine, according to the province.

Where's it's required

People will need to show proof of vaccination to enter gyms such as the Atlantic Fitness Centre in Charlottetown. (Kerry Campbell/CBC)

The government said proof of vaccination is required at indoor and outdoor organized gatherings and events, including but not limited to:

  • Sporting events, except for participants 18 and younger. (Spectators will need to show proof of vaccination).
  • Concerts, and arts, theatre and music events.
  • Wedding and funeral receptions and wakes.
  • Conferences, trade fairs and workshops.
  • Group activities and classes such as pottery, art and choir.
  • Adult group and team sports for people 19 years of age and older.
  • Food premises and licensed premises (indoor and patio dining).
  • Liquor tasting rooms in wineries, breweries or distilleries.
  • Casinos and movie theatres.
  • Indoor gyms, exercise/dance facilities/studios, swimming pools and skating rinks.
  • Outdoor facilities for organized gatherings/events and use by business and organizations.
  • Arcades and bowling alleys.

Where it's not required

T3 Transit will not be required to ask passengers for proof of vaccination. (Travis Kingdon/CBC)

The government said you do not have to show proof of COVID-19 vaccination at places or in settings such as:

  • Personal gatherings (i.e. friends and family getting together at someone's home), following the personal gathering limit.
  • Grocery stores.
  • Convenience stores.
  • Pharmacies.
  • Clothing stores.
  • Liquor stores.
  • Take-out, drive-through and delivery at food premises.
  • Local public transportation (for example, T3 Transit, taxis).
  • Salons, hairdressers and barbers.
  • Hotels, resorts, cabins and campsites (unless they are the location of an event where proof of vaccination is required. There is also a grace period for weddings to follow existing public health measures.).
  • Banks and credit unions.
  • Public libraries, museums, art galleries (unless they are the location of an event where proof of vaccination is required).
  • Food banks and shelters.
  • Health-care services, rehabilitation or exercise therapy programs, counselling services and self-help, and drug and alcohol support groups and programs.
  • Locations that offer government services and social services (for example, Access P.E.I.).
  • Worship services (including wedding and funeral ceremonies).
  • Individuals 18 years old or younger participating in youth sport. (Spectators must be vaccinated).
  • Before and after school programs for K to 12 students.
  • Student events and activities in K to 12 public and independent schools.

Proof of vaccination will not be required under the P.E.I. Vax Pass policy for employees of businesses and organizations that offer these activities and work in these settings, the province said. Businesses and organizations are encouraged to set their own vaccination policies that comply with the laws of Prince Edward Island.

The province requires businesses, services and events requiring proof of vaccination to perform a visual check of a person's vaccination record, as well as a photo ID matching the person's name.

Individuals are considered fully immunized 14 days after receiving the full series of a COVID-19 vaccine approved for use in Canada or a combination of two different COVID-19 vaccines approved for use in Canada.

now