PEI

Tyne Valley rink reopens Thursday

The centre had "a number" of air-quality tests over an eight-hour period Wednesday, and reopened Thursday, said rink manager Adam MacLennan.

About $30,000 lost due to closure, rink manager hopes for government help

The centre had 'a number' of air-quality tests over an eight-hour period Wednesday, and reopened Thursday, says rink manager Adam MacLennan. (Steve Bruce/CBC)

The Tyne Valley Community Sports Centre has reopened.

The centre had "a number" of air-quality tests over an eight-hour period Wednesday, and reopened Thursday, said rink manager Adam MacLennan.

"Our air-quality tests have come back fine yesterday and Environmental Health has no concerns over the facility being reopened," he said.

The arena had been closed since Monday due to higher than recommended carbon dioxide levels. Earlier in the week, MacLennan said the future of the rink was in limbo and the rink board reached out to the province for financial support to cover the cost of repairs.

I am sure the community will be happy as well.— Adam MacLennan, rink manager

People were already back using the rink Thursday afternoon, MacLennan said. 

"We'll be doing all that we can to put extra ice rentals in to try and make up for ice time that's been lost over the past month," he said.

Testing at the Tyne Valley rink

3 years ago
Duration 3:12
Air testing showed higher than recommended levels of carbon dioxide at the rink. Staff are busy retesting and trying to get to the bottom of the problem.

'It's a relief'

MacLennan said everything is back to normal at the arena.

"It's a relief to have the rink back open. I am sure the community will be happy as well," he said.

Rink manager Adam MacLennan says the arena lost about $30,000 because of the closures. (Steve Bruce/CBC)

This was the second time the rink has been shut down in less than a month. The facility was closed for about a week in November after people who visited reported experiencing shortness of breath, coughing and headaches. 

MacLennan said he plans to continue to monitor air quality in the arena. He said the arena has lost about $30,000 because of the shutdowns.

"That's an extremely high amount of money for a small community rink," MacLennan said.

On Wednesday, he said he'd like to see the government make it a requirement that all arenas on P.E.I. do testing like this regularly.

Last month, the province said it plans to take a closer look at the standards in place for Island rinks.

More P.E.I. news

With files from Angela Walker

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