PEI

Actor returns to P.E.I. for break from L.A. 'chaos'

After nine months of living through the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States, actor Tessa Mossey says she feels “very, very spoiled” to be back home in Charlottetown.

Tessa Mossey adapting to changes in the film industry caused by COVID-19

Tessa Mossey says auditioning from home is 'bizarre' but also somewhat comforting. (David Leyes )

After nine months of living through the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States, actor Tessa Mossey says she feels "very, very spoiled" to be back home in Charlottetown.

Mossey arrived in P.E.I. last week and is in the middle of her 14-day isolation period, far removed from what she called the chaos of Los Angeles.

There, she had been marching in civil rights protests, watching COVID-19 cases soar and living through a highly divisive presidential election.

"It's refreshing. There is a lot of tension in the U.S. right now, and it is nice to be here," she said.

The pandemic has made life different for a young actor trying to make her way in Hollywood. The industry was basically shut down, Mossey said.

Any auditions are taped and mailed in. Callbacks are done over a webcam.

Starred in TV miniseries

"Instead of waiting in a lobby somewhere, you're waiting in your living room just wondering when they're going to log on to your computer and enter your home and shift your home into this adrenaline-filled space," Mossey said.

"It's bizarre, but I guess somewhat comforting to be in a controlled environment when you're auditioning."

Mossey recently starred in the TV miniseries The Truth About the Harry Quebert Affair, alongside stars Patrick Dempsey and Virginia Madsen. Before that, she also appeared in the TV series Shadow Hunters, The Mortal Instruments, where she met her current partner, U.S. actor Alberto Rosende.

Mossey says it's refreshing to be on P.E.I. where the leadership is 'taking care of its citizens.' (Tessa Mossey)

She has auditioned for a few roles recently but didn't want to jinx herself by saying which ones. She said she invests a lot of time in the audition but then tries her best to forget about it so it's a "happy surprise" if she hears back.

"I think it's bad luck to talk about it because the second you mention it, you're definitely not going to get it," she said with a laugh.

The reality of being an actor is auditioning a lot and then hearing back sometimes, so you either need to know that that's part of the process or you need to be good at being rejected.— Tessa Mossey

"The reality of being an actor is auditioning a lot and then hearing back sometimes, so you either need to know that that's part of the process or you need to be good at being rejected."

Mossey has taken the opportunity to do some writing, and is working on a project as a producer/creator.

She also teaches an online yoga class.

Rosende has been working in Chicago in the NBC drama Chicago Fire, so Mossey took the opportunity to spend Christmas with her family on P.E.I. It's the first time she's been home in a year.

Lots of family on P.E.I.

Her mother and four of her five siblings live on P.E.I., as well as aunts, uncles, cousins and 11 nieces and nephews.

"I've been wanting to be on P.E.I. throughout this process, it would have been a lovely place to be throughout the chaos," she said.

"Obviously, when you have leadership that handles a health crisis properly, that's reflected in the health and mental health of the people too and you can almost feel that weight lifted a bit when you get to P.E.I. and know that there's leadership here that's taking care of its citizens and compassion from the citizens for each other as well."

More from CBC P.E.I.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Shane Ross is a former newspaper and TV journalist in Halifax, Ottawa and Charlottetown. He joined CBC P.E.I.'s web team in 2016.

now