PEI

P.E.I. teachers, staff get neon hairdos after students exceed Terry Fox fundraising goal

Students at West Royalty Elementary School in P.E.I. got to see the benefit from going above and beyond in their fundraising for the Terry Fox Foundation this year — a chance to see their entire teaching staff with neon-coloured hair on Wednesday.

'I don't care about toys, I care about Terry Fox more'

The entire staff at West Royalty Elementary School brightened up their hair with neon colours for the day. (Shane Hennessey/CBC)

Students at West Royalty Elementary School in P.E.I. got to see the benefit from going above and beyond in their fundraising for the Terry Fox Foundation this year — a chance to see their entire teaching staff with neon-coloured hair on Wednesday.

That was the challenge set forth by the school and there were a number of goals to help encourage the students to get involved.

If they raised $1,000, they would get an extra recess. At $1,500, the principal, vice-principal and physical education teachers would also all dye their hair pink for the day.

If they reached $2,000, the school specialists would dye their hair.

Then there was the final goal of $2,500.

'We were very pleased'

"If students raised that amount of money, all of our teaching staff and [educational assistants], custodial staff — any staff in the building would dye their hair a neon colour for the day," said school principal Marilyn MacLean.

"We were very pleased that the students rose to the occasion and they raised just over $2,700."

Terry Fox's brother Fred Fox spoke to students at West Royalty Elementary School on Wednesday. (Shane Hennessey/CBC)

The final total raised by the students was $2,763 and Wednesday was the day the students got to enjoy the extra recess time and colourfully-haired staff.

"I was shocked. It was so funny, I couldn't take my teacher seriously. Like pink hair, purple hair, all different colours," said Grade 6 student Natalya Haddad.

They also had a special guest visit the school to talk about Terry Fox's legacy — his older brother Fred Fox.

"Nine thousand schools in Canada are raising money for cancer research, keeping Terry's dream alive," Fox said, who is also the manager of supporter relations with the Terry Fox Foundation.

"Terry simply wanted to make a difference in cancer research and schools like West Royalty are doing just that."

There were various shades of neon for the teachers and staff at West Royalty Elementary School after the students raised more than $2,700 for the Terry Fox Foundation. (Shane Hennessey/CBC)

Some of the students had a personal connection to raise funds for cancer research.

Ben Green and his younger brother Sam managed to raise $600 for the cause by giving up part of their allowances and asking others to donate over the year.

"I don't care about toys, I care about Terry Fox more," Ben said.

"Our nana passed away from cancer. She always ran the Terry Fox run. That's why we do it every year."

Ben Green says it was important in his family to honour Terry Fox. He and his brother Sam raised $600 this year for the cause. (Shane Hennessey/CBC)

The amount of money raised has inspired the principal to commit to challenging the students in the future.

"I think we've started a tradition that we need to keep up here at West Royalty Elementary School and we'll be putting our heads together and coming up with a new challenge for next year," said MacLean.

"Each of us in our own little way can contribute and do meaningful things and by reaching our goals, that's one of the things that I think everybody can do."

More P.E.I. news

With files from Shane Hennessey

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