PEI

PEI Symphony turns to crowdfunding to keep afloat

The PEI Symphony has started an online crowdfunding campaign to help keep it afloat.

Online campaign's target is $15K

The PEI Symphony wants to at least break even this year, says Dan Rowswell, president of the board of directors. (Matt Rainnie/CBC)
The PEI Symphony has started an online crowdfunding campaign to help keep it afloat.

The symphony has 240 subscribers, but like many arts organizations, it has experienced a drop in funding from governments, corporate sponsors and private donors, says Dan Rowswell, president of the symphony's board of directors.

Rowswell says the symphony has been struggling financially over the past few years.

"The brutal reality is no organization in arts or in business can continue to lose money year over year. We have to at least break even," said Rowswell.

"You know, three to four years of losing money, our operational debt on paper now is about $60,000. Without at least achieving our objective of breaking even this year, then the future is at risk for the organization."

The symphony has set a target of $15,000 for its Indiegogo campaign, says Rowswell.

The deadline is April 26.

He says so far, more than $1,900 hundred dollars has been raised.

The symphony, which is nearly 50 years old, plays four concerts a year. Its next concert is this Sunday at Zion Presbyterian Church in Charlottetown.

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