PEI

Sen. Murray Sinclair awarded 2019 Symons Medal

Sen. Murray Sinclair, appointed to the Senate in April 2016, was the first Indigenous judge to be appointed in Manitoba and the second Indigenous judge to be appointed in Canada.

Award recognizes individual who has made exceptional contribution to Canadian life

Murray Sinclair was the chief commissioner of the Truth and Reconciliation Committee. (CBC News)

Sen. Murray Sinclair will receive the 2019 Symons Medal in Charlottetown in November. Sinclair will also speak at the ceremony.

Sinclair was the first Indigenous judge to be appointed in Manitoba and the second Indigenous judge to be appointed in Canada. He was appointed to the Senate in April 2016.

In more than 25 years of service in the justice system in Manitoba, Sinclair has served as co-chair of the Aboriginal Justice Inquiry in Manitoba, as an adjunct professor of law at the University of Manitoba and was the chief commissioner of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

During his time with the TRC, Sinclair participated in hundreds of hearing across Canada which resulted in its 2015 report.  

Sinclair has won numerous awards in the past for his work within his profession and community.

He was the recipient of the Meritorious Service Cross in 2017 and the Manitoba Bar Association's Distinguished Service Award in 2016.  He also holds honorary doctorates from eight Canadian Universities.

In good company

Named for Prof. Thomas H. B. Symons, the award is given to a distinguished person who has made an exceptional contribution to Canadian life.

The award is presented at the Confederation Centre of the Arts. Since 2004, 18 Symons medallists have been honoured.

Prior recipients include Justin Trudeau, Prince Charles and David Suzuki.  

The award will be presented to Sinclair on Nov. 1, at the Homburg Theatre in Charlottetown, and will be live streamed on Confederation Centre's YouTube channel.  

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