PEI

Summerside still seeking solutions for evicted mobile home tenants

The City of Summerside will be asking the P.E.I. government to update legislation around mobile home parks, in order to better protect residents.

Motion put forward in response to Heritage Park eviction, though any changes wouldn't help those residents

Residents of Heritage Park Mobile Home Sites were given six months notice to vacate the property. (Jane Robertson/CBC)

The City of Summerside will be asking the P.E.I. government to update legislation around mobile home parks, in order to better protect residents.

A motion to make that formal request to the province passed unanimously during the city's monthly council meeting Monday night.

The request comes after residents of Heritage Park Mobile Home Sites were given notices of eviction in May. Many say they haven't been able to find anywhere else to move their mobile homes. 

"There really needs to be more protection in this province for citizens so they don't continue to be exposed to these kinds of situations," said Coun. Brian McFeely, who presented the motion to council. 

Coun. Brian McFeely presented a motion to ask the province to review and update legislation related to mobile home parks. (Sarah MacMillan/CBC)

"Looking at all the factors associated with closure, from the period of time that they must give notification for, to compensation; when you look at other legislation in other jurisdictions, the legislation is much much stronger," McFeely said. 

Motion to discuss land purchase not presented

Another motion planned for the meeting, regarding possible purchase of the Heritage Park land, was not put forward.

At a committee of council meeting earlier this month, Coun. Gordie Whitlock presented a notice of motion to ask council to continue to ask the owner to give residents more time to leave, and also to begin negotiations to purchase the property.

However Whitlock ultimately decided to remove the motion from Monday's agenda. 

Gordie Whitlock didn't expect his motion to pass, so he has decided to focus on other efforts to help the Heritage Park residents. (Sarah MacMillan/CBC)

"I'm more interested in finding solutions for these folks than trying to put a motion on the floor that I know is not going to pass," Whitlock said. 

Whitlock said he is glad to see other efforts by council to try to help the Heritage Park residents. In addition to negotiating with the owner, councillors have also had discussions with community organizations, such as the Rotary Club, about ways they could help the residents find new homes, or afford to move their mobile homes. 

Residents express frustration

A number of Heritage Park residents attended the council meeting Monday night. The gallery was filled with more than 20 people. 

When leaving the meeting, many expressed their frustration with council, and what they say is a lack of concrete action.

"The clock is just ticking and it feels like they're just going to run out the clock and these people are going to have nowhere to go," said resident Pamela Detlor. 

Heritage Park residents filled the public gallery during Summerside council's monthly meeting. (Sarah MacMillan/CBC)

McFeely said he understands the frustrations, and said the council is doing what it can to assist.

"The city has no legal authority at all in this particular situation. But certainly, you know, from a moral perspective we want to do everything we can to help these folks," McFeely said. 

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Sarah MacMillan is a reporter with CBC Sudbury. She previously worked with CBC P.E.I. You can contact her at sarah.macmillan@cbc.ca

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